Ancestral Family Topic 228

 228   William Carr (c.1752-1835)
Pedigree Chart 08

William Carr, in his own words
If he could speak to us today, William Carr might describe his life as follows.

I was born about 1752 because John Carr, my guardian, stopped accounting to the court on how he was managing my inheritance in 1773. John was probably my older brother, both of us sons of Thomas Carr.
A Baptist, I signed a petition in 1775 to abolish the established church.  Within a year Mr. Jefferson did just that—he saw to it that Virginia disestablished the Anglican Church.
The Revolution was well underway when James Hodges sold me 80 acres on both sides of Bradley Creek lying along Lick Creek 16 June 1777.  I was too old to fight, myself, but I did let the Army use one of my horses for 6 years, for which they reimbursed me £60,  and I got 9 shillings when our county militia took one of my blankets off to North Carolina where they were to join General Greene’s army. 
Tabitha and I were the parents of five we reared in our 512-square foot home. Of course, this did not count the kitchen and several other buildings we had on the property. In 1782 I was head of a household of six whites.  Although I owned no slaves then, I had at least 6 by 1800.
I was an 86-year-old great-grandfather when I prepared my will in 1833. I was still living about two miles south of Republican Grove on the land Hodges sold me 56 years earlier and then owned 13 slaves. Illiterate, I made my mark on the sheet.

In 1785 the plantation belonging to William Carr included dwelling houses of 32’ by 16’, 20’ by 16’, 16’ by 16’, 16’ by 8’, 8’ by 8’, and 4’ by 4’ and 7 “cabins.”  Nine were then in his family. 
Deeds identify William Carr’s wife as Tabitha and the mother of Thomas B. and William H. Carr.  According to his will, William was the father of Jane, Mary, and Silas Carr and we presume their mother was Tabitha.
William bought another 235 acres from James Hodges 23 Sept. 1783,  and continued to pay taxes on 314 acres into 1803.
My William Carr, who was illiterate, was soon designated as senior, presumably to distinguish him from another of the same name who later bought land along Bradley Creek. A 1785 deed to John Carr for land on Bradley Creek mentioned land next to William Carr Sr. and William Carr Jr. 
In 1800 Halifax County taxed William Carr Sr. on one tithable, 4 horses, and 6 slaves more than 12 years of age.  No other William Carr appeared then in the county. William Carr Sr. was a qualified voter in Halifax in 1808. 

Another William Carr
The 1785 enumeration of Halifax County lists William Carr Sr. with one dwelling house, 20’ by 16’, and 4 cabins.  Seven whites were in his family.  Although he lived within 5 miles of my William Carr, we have yet to identify him.
This William Carr was literate while my William Carr was not. This William Carr bought 100 acres from John Milam 20 Feb. 1783, and 185 acres from John Baber 7 Feb. 1788.  A 1785 deed to John Carr for land on Bradley Creek mentioned land next to William Carr Sr. and William Carr Jr. 
The same day that John Milam sold Carr land, he sold neighboring tracts to Samuel Milam and Thomas Milam.  The William Carr and Thomas Milam deeds disallowed the resale of the land during John Milam’s lifetime and left the blank for the sales consideration empty. These deeds suggest that William Carr was John Milam’s son-in-law.
In 1787 William Carr is taxed on his land, in 1789 he had a black check next to his name, in 1790 he had an “i” next to his name, and in 1791 he is gone from the land tax records, but was a qualified voter in Halifax County in 1800. 

William makes his will
The following is the will William Carr marked 1 Aug. 1833. He died before 28 Sept. 1835 when James Atkinson presented his will to the Halifax County Court.


Will of William Carr
1 August 1833
I William Carr of the County of Halifax being old and Infirm but of sound and disposing mind and memory do make this my last will and testament in manner following that is to say:
I direct that all my Just debts be paid by my executor herein after named.
I give to my Grandson Thomas A. Carr son of Thomas Carr, deceased, the lower part of the tract of land on which I now live including the mansion house to be laid off by a line commencing on the ridge path leading to Hawkins old place fifty Yards above a small old field in Tuckers line thence a straight line across the plantation and crossing Bradley Creek to the corner between my land the land of John Carr and of William Pringle I also give to my said Grandson Thomas A. Carr the following Negroes, to wit, Rawley, Mahaly, Jordan, and Young Ransom also two beds and furniture, one walnut desk, one walnut cupboard, one walnut chest, folding table, clock and case, two trunks, one case and bottles, and all my plantation tools including ____ cart lock chain, and cross-cut saw to him and his heirs forever but my said Grandson Thomas A. Carr is not to have the possession of the land and other property hereby devised and bequeathed to him until he shall arrive to the age of twenty one Years. —
I give to my Granddaughter Milinett Carr and Margaret Carr the balance of the tract of land on which I live to be divided between them by a line beginning at the same point at which the former line is directed to commence thence a straight line to Joseph H. Crews’ line to be run so as to make the two lots as nearly equal as may be regarding quality and quantity. The lot lying on Bradley Creek & Lick Branch I devise to Margaret and the other lot to Milinett to them and their heirs forever. But the said Milinett and Margaret are not to have the possession of the land hereby devised to them until they shall respectively arrive to the age of twenty Years or Marry which ever shall first happen.
I give to my three grandchildren Adeline, Paul, and Patience Carr children of my son William H. Carr three Negroes to wit Omerica, Daniel, and Dilcy with their future increase to be equally divided between them whenever the oldest of them shall arrive to the age of twenty-one Years or marry whichever shall first happen but if either of my said Grandchildren should die before such division shall take place, I give the said shares to the survivors of them.
I give to my Granddaughter Jane Frasier one Negro boy Israel for and during her natural life and at her death to her children to equally divided between them
I give to my Granddaughter Francis Farmer one Negro Girl Eliza for and during her natural life and at her death to her children to be equally divided between them.
I give to my Granddaughter Elizabeth Carr daughter of my son Thomas Carr decd one Negro woman Rachel for and during her natural life and at her death to be equally divided among her children
I give to my Granddaughter Milinett Carr one Negro boy Anthony for and during her natural life and at her death to be equally divided among her children but she is not [to] receive the possession of the said slave until she shall arrive to the age of Eighteen Years or marry whichever shall first happen.
I give to my Grandson Morgan Carr one Negro boy Mason but he is not to receive the possession of him until he shall arrive to the age of twenty-one Years —
I give to the children of my granddaughter Sally Tucker equally to be divided among them one Negro boy Joe —
I give to my daughter-in-law Nancy Carr the widow of my son Thomas Carr decd and to my Grandchildren Elizabeth Carr, Milinett Carr, Margaret Carr, and Morgan Carr each one bed and furniture —
It is my will and desire that all my estate not herein before specially devised and bequeathed as well as that which has been so specifically devised and bequeathed until the time at which the several devices and legatees shall be entitled to receive possession it be kept together my executers herein after named and the proceeds thereof be applied to the support and maintenance of my daughter-in-law Nancy Carr the widow of my son Thomas Carr deceased her four children, to wit, Milinett, Morgan, Margaret, and Thomas A. Carr and for their education until they shall respectively arrive to the age of twenty-one Years or shall otherwise be entitled to receive the legacies herein before bequeathed to them and if there shall be any surplus above their necessary support and education to remain in the hands of my executers to be disposed of as herein after directed. And to enable my executors fully to executed this provision of my will I do vest them with full power and authority to dispose of the perishable estate which in their discretion they may think will best promote the interest of my estate and also to purchase horses or other stock which they may think necessary for the use of the plantation.
I Give to my two Grandchildren Margaret Carr and Thomas Children of my son Thomas Carr decd all the remaining part of my estate not herein before disposed of whatever nature or kind it may be to be delivered to them when my Grandson the said Thomas A. Carr shall arrive to the age of twenty-one Years and it is hereby expressly declared that this bequest is intended to embrace not only such property money or effects as I may die possessed of above what may be required to pay my debts and funeral expenses but also all the profits of my estate which may accrue under the clause of my will next proceeding this. But the said Margaret Carr and Thomas A. Carr are to give a decent support and maintenance to their mother from the time the said Thomas A Carr arrives at age during her life or widowhood and it is hereby expressly declared that if the said Nancy Carr should hereafter marry from that time she will have no right to a support out of my estate—
Lastly I do appoint my friend James Atkinson and John M ______ executers of this my last will and Testament hereby revoking all and every other will or wills heretofore made by me In Testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and affixed my seal this 1st day of August 1833.
William [X] Carr
Peter Rives
Joel Hubbard
Zebedee Petty


Executor John M___ was possibly neighbor John Milam Jr. Carr left substantially all his estate to heirs of his dead son Thomas B. Carr, mentioned neither son Silas Carr nor daughter Mary (Carr) Ridgeway, and left slaves only to heirs of William H. Carr and Jane (Carr) Bass. When James Atkinson presented William Carr’s will at Halifax County court 28 Sept. 1835, James Tucker and William Ridgeway contested the will and on 23 Nov. 1835 Silas Carr and William Carr came to court to join the challenge.
On 29-30 March 1836 the court heard testimony of the parties and sundry witnesses, concluded that William Carr “was of sound disposing mind and memory” when he wrote his will, and order the clerk to record it. On 29 June 1836 the court concluded the executors were not qualified to serve and Jordan R. Lipscomb, then the husband of Mary Ann (DeJarnatt) Carr—former wife of William’s son William H. Carr—moved that Sheriff Peter Rives administer the will. The court granted administration with the will annexed to Zebedee Petty 27 Nov. 1838.

Descendants of William Carr
Information about the children of William Carr, their descendants, and allied families previously found at Virginians.com is now available as Southside Virginia Genealogies. Learn more 
Names found in this topic include the following.
 Jane (Carr) Bass,  
Peter Bass,  
Sarah W. Bass,  James Tucker,  
Elizabeth A. Tucker,  
Susan F. Tucker,  
Sarah W. Tucker,  
Mary P. Tucker,  
Alice A. Tucker,  
 Thomas B. Carr (-1828),  
 William H. Carr (c.1790-1882),  
 Mary (Carr) Ridgeway,  
William Ridgeway,  
 Silas Addison Carr (1801-1863),  
Nancy Martin,   



Notes
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